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‘Kid Crazy and the Kilowatt King’ Book Review

'Kid Crazy and the Kilowatt King' Book Review

I place great value on reading. I have always been an avid reader myself, and now my daughter also loves reading on her own. My son, too, loves listening to his big sister and me read aloud to him. I thus am always on the lookout for new books to share with my kids. When recently offered the chance to review Kid Crazy and the Kilowatt King written by Claudio Sanchez and illustrated by Arthur Mask in exchange for my honest opinion, I eagerly accepted the opportunity to add to my home library. The hardback book currently retails for $24.95 on Amazon.

Author and Illustrator

Author Claudio Sanchez is the front man for the conceptual rock band Coheed and Cambria. Kid Crazy and the Kilowatt King is his first children’s book. In addition to selling over three million albums worldwide with his band, Sanchez has also created several comic books. He currently lives in Brooklyn with his wife and their son, Altas. His wife, Chondra Echert Sanchez, edited the book and has also co-written several comic books with her husband.

Illustrator Arthur Mask illustrates books, magazines, games, and comics. His first drawing was of a mosquito, but now he prefers to draw monsters. He currently lives in Sao Paolo, Brazil.

Text

“The idea for Kid Crazy actually started as a rock opera in the vein of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars,” explains Sanchez, “but as it took shape, it began to feel like something that could appeal to a child’s imagination — a kind of fantastic journey with a lesson.”

Recommended for readers between the ages of 4 and 8, the 80-page book begins with a boy lost at sea named Kid Crazy Carlson. From his desert home, he peered at the city and longed to explore the place. One day a robot appears and warns Kid about the rude and sour king who rules the city. Kid decides to pursue his desires anyway and sets out on an adventure to the city during which he passes through strange but beautiful landscapes and other sights. Upon reaching the city, Kid Crazy finds himself face-to-face with the nasty ruler and decides to teach the Kilowatt King a lesson about the power of manners and the word please.

First, I love the lyrical quality of the text in Kid Crazy and the Kilowatt King. I am quite fond of the rock opera genre, and I have always been a fan of rhymed verse in children’s books. The story flows right off my tongue, and the rhymes are quite pleasing. My kindergartener daughter, who has been reading on her own for over six months now, can read most of the text on her own. My toddler son also enjoys sitting next to me as I read the book aloud. I especially appreciate the message at the end of the story. When I first read the book, I had not read any synopses yet, so I was a bit unsure about the direction in which the story was headed. However, once I reached the end, I was pleased at the important and powerful message about the need for manners and the world please. As a mother of two young children, I give any book that reinforces the need to ask politely my approval.

Cover of 'Kid Crazy and the Kilowatt King' Inside Pages of 'Kid Crazy and the Kilowatt King'

Illustrations

What draws me to Kid Crazy and the Kilowatt King even more than the story are the illustrations. The comic book style is surreal and fantastical with a hint of magical. Most other books for children use a different illustration style than the one found in this book, so I appreciate the exposure to a different art genre. Furthermore, the illustrations remind me a bit of Star Wars, which I absolutely love. My toddler son loves the robots throughout the pages and especially loves pointing out the dancing elephants. My daughter also enjoys looking at the pictures as she reads the book to herself. Overall I am quite impressed with the illustrations in this children’s book.

Final Verdict

If you are searching for a children’s book that reinforces the importance of politeness and using the word please, definitely check out Kid Crazy and the Kilowatt King written by Claudio Sanchez and illustrated by Arthur Mask. The 80-page full-color book follows a boy lost at sea named Kid Crazy Carlson on his journey into a city ruled by the rude Kilowatt King. I love the lyrical quality of the text, which is recommended for young readers between the ages of 4 and 8. Both my kids love listening to the story, and all three of us enjoy the illustrations, which are a bit more surreal than most books for children. Overall I am quite impressed with Kid Crazy and the Kilowatt King and highly recommend the book!

Purchase Kid Crazy and the Kilowatt King on Amazon via my affiliate link.

Image Credits

‘Kid Crazy and the Kilowatt King’ Book Review © 2016 Heather Johnson
Cover of ‘Kid Crazy and the Kilowatt King’ © 2016 Heather Johnson
Inside Pages of ‘Kid Crazy and the Kilowatt King’ © 2016 Heather Johnson

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