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Recommended Vaccination Schedule from Two to Ten Years

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends a number of vaccines for toddlers, preschoolers, and children between the ages of two and ten. Find out which vaccines are recommended and at what times with the following recommended vaccination schedule for children from two to ten years old.

Recommended Vaccines

Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis (DTaP): Diphtheria is a contagious bacterial disease that results in suffocation, heart failure, and paralysis. Tetanus is a bacterial infection that causes painful spasms and muscle stiffness. Pertussis, or whooping cough, initially causes symptoms similar to the common cold but can result in seizures, pneumonia, brain damage, and death, especially in babies and young children. The combination DTaP vaccine should be administered between 4 and 6 years.

Hepatitis A (HepA): Hepatitis A is a liver infection that can result in death and which is spread through contact with infected feces. The HepA vaccine should be administered to children in certain high-risk groups between 2 and 10 years.

Hepatitis B (HepB): Hepatitis B is a liver infection that causes liver disease, cirrhosis, and cancer and which is spread through contact with infected blood and other bodily fluids. The HepB vaccine should be administered to children on a catch-up schedule between 7 and 10 years.

Inactivated Poliovirus (IPV): The poliovirus is a viral infection that results in paralysis or death. The IPV vaccine should be administered between 4 and 6 years and between 7 and 10 years for children on a catch-up schedule

Influenza (Flu): Influenza is a viral infection that often results in pneumonia, bronchitis, or death in young children. Influenza can also lead to complications resulting in hospitalization and death for all age groups. The Flu vaccine should be administered yearly. The first time the Flu vaccine is administered, the child will need two doses spaced two to four weeks apart.

Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR): Measles is a viral infection that often causes pneumonia, seizures, brain damage, and death. Mumps can lead to meningitis, encephalitis, hearing loss, swelling of the testes, and sterility. Rubella, or German measles, causes fever, swollen glands, and a rash; rubella is most dangerous for pregnant women, resulting in birth defects or death of the fetus. The combination MMR vaccine should be administered between 4 and 6 years and between 7 and 10 years for children on a catch-up schedule.

Meningococcal (MCV4): Meningococcal disease causes fever, headache, stiff neck, nausea, vomiting, photophobia, and altered mental status and can result in permanent disabilities, amputations, and death. The MCV4 vaccine should be administered between 2 and 10 years.

Pneumococcal (PPSV): Pneumococcal disease is a bacterial infection that causes sepsis, pneumonia, and meningitis as well as hearing loss, vision loss, and death. The PPSV vaccine should be administered to children in high-risk groups between 2 and 10 years.

Varicella (Var): Varicella, or chicken pox, can result in severe infections of the skin, brain, or lungs; sterility, and death. The Var vaccine should be administered between 4 and 6 years and between 7 and 10 years for children on a catch-up schedule.

Vaccination Schedule

Recommended Vaccination Schedule from Two to Ten Years

Disclaimer: The information provided in this article is not meant to replace the professional medical advice from your pediatrician. Additional information about the recommended vaccination schedule is available from the CDC or your health care professional.

References

Behen, Madonna. 2011. Sure shots: Your 18-month vaccine timeline. American Baby (Jan.).
Meningitis: Signs & Symptoms: http://www.cdc.gov/meningitis/about/symptoms.html
Recommended immunization schedule for persons aged 0 through 6 years: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/schedules/downloads/child/0-6yrs-schedule-pr.pdf
Recommended immunization schedule for persons aged 7 through 18 years:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/schedules/downloads/child/7-18yrs-schedule-pr.pdf

Image Credits

Recommended immunization schedule for persons aged 0 through 6 years: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/schedules/downloads/child/0-6yrs-schedule-pr.pdf
Recommended immunization schedule for persons aged 7 through 18 years:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/schedules/downloads/child/7-18yrs-schedule-pr.pdf

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