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  • Not All Forms That Function as Adverbials Are Adverbs
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    Not All Forms That Function as Adverbials Are Adverbs

    The other day I read a tweet that made some claims about adverbs: “The -s in “unawares,” as in “they were caught unawares,” is completely distinct from the pluralizing -s. It’s an adverb suffix, and it’s also in “always” and “nowadays,” and in “nights,” “weekends,” etc., as in “they work nights/weekends.” #FunWithMorphology” The -s in […] More

  • Types of Nouns: Common, Proper, Collective, Compound, Count, and Noncount
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    Types of Nouns: Common, Proper, Collective, Compound, Count, and Noncount

    Traditional grammars define nouns as “words that name people, places, things, and ideas.” Prototypical nouns express grammatical number, singular and plural, as well as possession. English nouns may be further classified into more specific categories: common versus proper, collective, compound, and count versus noncount. Common and Proper Nouns The first types of nouns are common […] More

  • Grammatical Form of English Nouns
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    Grammatical Form of English Nouns

    Traditional grammars define nouns as “words that refer to people, places, things, and ideas.” Pronouns are a subcategory of nouns. Noun phrases are phrases formed by a noun functioning as the phrase head plus any determinatives, modifiers, and complements. In English, prototypical nouns and noun phrases perform eleven grammatical functions: Noun phrase head Subject Subject […] More

  • English Nouns
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    English Nouns

    Notional grammars define nouns as “words that name people, places, things, and ideas.” Noun phrases are phrases that consist of a noun or pronoun plus any modifiers, complements, and determiners. Grammatical Forms Grammatical Form of English Nouns explains the internal structures that distinguish nouns from other grammatical forms, which include number and possession. Types of […] More