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    Using Nouns and Noun Phrases as Subject Complements

    Using Nouns and Noun Phrases as Subject Complements

    In traditional grammar books, nouns have been defined as describing people, places, things, and ideas. Noun phrases consist of a noun and any modifiers, complements, and determiners that provide more information about the noun. A pronoun is word that takes the place of a noun or noun phrase. Pronouns are a subcategory of nouns.

    In grammar, a subject complement is a word, phrase, or clause that follows a copular, or linking, verb and describes the subject of a clause. A noun that performs the grammatical function of subject complement is also called a predicate nominative or predicate noun. Examples of nouns including pronouns and noun phrases as subject complements include the following:

    • My favorite animals are dogs. (noun)
    • The boys became teachers. (noun)
    • This is she. (pronoun)
    • Her favorite aunt is me. (pronoun)
    • His desire to coach the Bears seemed a very loft goal. (noun phrase)
    • That chocolate cake was the best thing I ever ate. (noun phrase)

    Noun Phrase as Subject Complement

    Noun Phrase as Subject Complement

    Pronoun as Subject Complement

    Pronoun as Subject Complement

    References

    Brinton, Laurel J. & Donna M. Brinton. 2010. The linguistic structure of Modern English, 2nd edn. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company.
    Hopper, Paul J. 1999. A short course in grammar. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.
    Huddleston, Rodney. 1984. Introduction to the grammar of English. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

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