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Make Your Home Safer During National Window Covering Safety Month

This post was sponsored by the Window Covering Safety Council as part of an Influencer Activation for Influence Central, and all opinions expressed in my post are my own.

Make Your Home Safer During National Window Covering Safety Month

October is National Window Covering Safety Month! According to the US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), corded window coverings are one of the top five hidden hazards in American homes. Exposed or hanging cords on window coverings can pose a strangulation hazard to infants and young children. Dangling cords attract small kids but can easily become wrapped around little necks in the blink of an eye. Too many children have been injured or killed after becoming entangled in window covering cords. The Window Covering Safety Council (WCSC) therefore recommends using only cordless window coverings or window coverings with inaccessible cords in homes with children.

National Window Covering Safety Month

When my husband and I moved into our home, many of the windows were covered with corded blinds and shades. Most of the window coverings were old and ugly, but, more importantly, I knew that corded coverings posed a strangulation hazard to infants and young children. Even before my husband and I considered having a baby, I started working on changing out the old corded blinds and shades for cordless alternatives.

If you still want blinds or shades, you can more easily make the right choice when selecting your window coverings by looking for the Best for Kids™ certification label. Window covering manufacturers must meet specific criteria and submit their products to a designated third party testing laboratory in order to qualify for the Best for Kids™ certification. You can find certified window coverings at major retailers throughout the United States. Parents and caregivers should choose only cordless window coverings or window coverings with inaccessible cords to eliminate one hazard within the home. Curtains and cordless blinds are safe options in homes with young children.

Best for Kids

My kids are absolute balls of energy, getting into anything and everything around the house. I have locks on my cabinets, gates in doorways and stairs, anchors on tippable furniture, and covers over outlets. I have also replaced all the corded window covers in my home with cordless versions.

Unfortunately, corded window coverings are often overlooked, leaving dangerous strangulation within reach of curious little ones. With National Window Covering Safety Month coming to an end, make sure your window coverings are as safe for your young children as possible!

Window Covering Safety Infographic

Image Credits

Make Your Home Safer During National Window Covering Safety Month: https://www.flickr.com/photos/36041246@N00/4418542710/ (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)
National Window Covering Safety Month: http://windowcoverings.org/window-covering-safety-council-educates-military-parents-about-hidden-window-cord-hazards/
Best for Kids: http://windowcoverings.org/safety-month/
Window Covering Safety Infographic: http://windowcoverings.org/safety-month/

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Written by Heather

Heather is a writer, librarian, linguist, wife, homemaker, homeschooler, and mother.

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